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Seed Force™ offers a wide range of short to long-term ryegrass – and the know-how to get the best results.

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Annual ryegrass

Italian ryegrass

Understanding the types

Lolium multiflorum westerwoldicum

Ryegrass that is limited to one year’s production is also referred to as annual ryegrasss, or Westerwold ryegrass, and is a sub species of Lolium multiflorum. Westerwold annual ryegrass is well known for its quick establishment and early vigour.

It should be sown from the beginning of autumn until early winter, and under favourable conditions can produce up to 5 to 6 grazings/cuts. These annual ryegrass varieties can be diploid or tetraploid and can vary in maturity from early to late season.

Mid-late maturity varieties are better suited to New Zealand where late grazing or a second cut can be achieved. Annual ryegrass has no associated animal health issues caused by toxic endophyte.

Lolium multiflorum

The true Italian ryegrass is capable of producing feed over one to three years depending on climate and management. Italian ryegrass varieties can be diploid or tetraploid and can vary in maturity from mid to late season. They are quick to establish and provide growth over the full season.

Production starts early in the spring and goes through late into the autumn, providing quality dry matter at these critical times. Italian ryegrass has no associated animal health issues caused by toxic endophyte.

Lolium boucheanum

Hybrid ryegrass offers similar production capabilities as Italian ryegrass with the additional benefit of greater persistence. Hybrids offer flexibility in pasture systems, providing productivity over a longer period with quick establishment and good cool season production.

Lolium perenne

Perennial ryegrass is the primary species in New Zealand’s permanent pastures. It tolerates a range of conditions and management practices, establishes quickly, has a high feed value and yields well. Diploid varieties are more suited to rotational-set stocking and can tolerate drier climates, whereas tetraploid varieties need rotational grazing management and adequate moisture.